Sunday, May 27, 2012

Survey on the Proposed Establishment of BCPM


http://kict.iium.edu.my/survey/

There is currently an initiative to establish a Board of Computing Professionals Malaysia (BCPM), which will function to accredit ICT academic programmes, as well as to promote, facilitate and regulate the profession (very much like the Board of Engineers for engineering, and the Bar Council for the legal profession, etc.). This initiative is under the purview of the Ministry of Science and Innovation (MOSTI) and led by the National ICT Human Resource Task Force under the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) and within the ICT Human Capital Development Framework.

We would like to invite all ICT practitioners and those related to the profession to participate in an on-line survey that will be open for responses from Monday 28 June 2012 (00:00) to Monday 11 June 2012 (24:00). The survey aims to solicit feedback from the ICT community to determine the overall suitability and general acceptance to the proposal for the establishment of the BCPM. The survey site is at

http://kict.iium.edu.my/survey/

The introduction to the survey and the instructions for filling the questionnaire will be provided at the stated site, as well as a link to another site that provides the general context to the proposal. Although we do not foresee any problem that may occur at the said site, should there be difficulties, an alternative site will be made available at http://cserver.cs.usm.my/bcpm/.

For those who are able to attend, there will be an awareness and Q&A session followed by a paper survey to be held at the Putrajaya International Convention Centre (PICC), Putrajaya Precinct 5, on Monday 28 June 2012. A formal session will be held at 9.00-12.30 am, and informal sessions will be during 2.30-5.00 pm.

We look forward to your participation in the survey and thank you in advance.

Sumber

http://www.mosti.gov.my/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2354%3Asesi-kaji-selidik-bagi-mengumpul-maklum-balas-mengenai-cadangan-penubuhan-board-of-computing-professionals-malaysia-bcpm&catid=44%3Aupcoming-events&Itemid=123&lang=en


Objective


This questionnaire is to solicit feedback from the ICT community to determine the overall suitability and general acceptance to the proposal for the establishment of the Board of Computing Professionals Malaysia (BCPM).

Context

The proposal for the establishment of the BCPM is the third of three strategic thrusts recommended by the National ICT Human Resource Task Force under the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE) within the ICT Human Capital Development Framework. The framework provides a set of national initiatives towards producing more resilient ICT graduates and transforming the country into a producer nation in ICT software and applications. This is to be attained via the developent of a sufficiently large and readily available pool of highly competent computing professionals, being those who innovate, design, implement and maintain computers, computing systems, and computing applications. [More details are available at http://goo.gl/nXBwb]


A draft Bill (RUU – Rang Undang-Undang) for this purpose had been prepared in December 2011, which was circulated for a preliminary discussion on an Open Day held at MOSTI on Tuesday 13 December 2011, with the period for feedback left open until Friday 30 January 2012. The feedback obtained was analysed and discussed, which subsequently led to the contents of the questionnaire in this survey.

This survey will be open for responses, either through face-to-face at the end of a series of awareness programme sessions, or through a portal, for a period of 15 days from Monday 28 May to Monday 11 June. The results of this survey will be analysed and the appropriate recommendations will be forwarded to the Ministry of Science and Innovations (MOSTI) for the appropriate action. Ultimately, based on the results, the draft Bill/RUU will be:
  • Amended accordingly and tabled at Parliament for adoption; or 
  • Adopted via other means (e.g. via Industry); or 
  • Abandoned altogether.

Underlying Intentions

First and foremost, it is crucial to note that the Bill/RUU is only a vehicle, where the exact underlying intentions are to have the following:

  • To establish a class of Professionals that can be distinguished from ordinary IT providers and will also guarantee a certain level of expertise/standards and be accountable for their services. 
  •  To attain international recognition and/or equivalence, especially via the Seoul Accord (see below), and in particular for our Computing/ICT degrees.
 The questionnaire will address the six points that support the underlying intentions for the establishment of the BCPM, the associated Bill, and the overall implementation, namely the following:  


1. The need for Certification of Professionals and to sign the Seoul Accord:

There has always been a strong desire to make our Computing/ICT graduates have a professional status (akin to engineers, medical doctors, accountants, etc.) as well as be internationally recognised as such. Three points are very relevant here:
  • The best way to achieve both is to sign the Seoul Accord (equivalent to the Washington Accord for engineering), which will not only enforce the maintenance of the required level to be considered professionals, but it also provides a status that is recognised worldwide.
  • However, all signatories of the Seoul Accord need to have a Board (or Society or any entity) that is equivalent to the proposed BCPM, which will have to be accorded the necessary authority and be responsible to audit and accredit Computing/ICT programmes, to register professional members, and to regulate them.
  • It is important to note that with the professional status comes a considerably high degree of responsibility, especially in terms of a guarantee of quality and accountability.

2. The need for a Bill/RUU:

Unlike in many countries, it is by tradition and practice that all Boards of Professionals in Malaysia had been set up via an Act of Parliament, and this is strongly perceived to be so (else, few will feel the compulsion to adhere to the Board’s regulations). In any case, the Bill can be seen to be the surest and fastest way of getting the underlying intentions implemented.  


3. Registration with BCPM will be voluntary:
Once the BCPM is set up, four points are of major relevance:
  • Graduates from the BCPM (hence Seoul Accord) accredited degrees will automatically qualify to be Registered Computing Practitioners, and later become Registered Computing Professionals after acquiring some experience and satisfying certain criteria.
  • Both registrations will also be open to other graduates and even non-graduates based on certain required and proven experience to be established by the Board.
  • The above are essentially criteria to qualify for registration, but no individual is compelled to be registered with the BCPM, and once registered may also opt to de-register himself.
  • There have also been proposals to have the category of Registered Service Providers for companies, but should this proposal be accepted, registration will also be voluntary. 

4. Regulatory matters apply only to BCPM registered members:

In the implementation of the Act and the BCPM, three points are to be noted:
  • The provisions of the Act and the ensuing regulations (from the Act and from the Board) apply only to its registered members, and hence only to individuals (and not the companies or institutions they represent). [The exception would be for the Registered Service Providers should the category be adopted.]
  • The above would mean that there will be no official regulations that would compel projects (government or otherwise) to be proposed and carried out only by BCPM registered members.
  • Nonetheless, it is also important to note that project owners (government or otherwise) may voluntarily choose for their projects to be proposed and carried out by BCPM registered members only – as is the case for a few countries with their BCPM equivalent (and often with the addition of ISO conditions). 

5. The Board needs to be neutral:

To ensure acceptance by the ICT community, industry and the public in general, the Board needs to be neutral at all levels and it has to be seen to be so:
  • This has to be in terms of its composition (the President and executive members), the decisions it makes, its actions, etc.
  • Neutrality, impartiality and independence of the Board are also strict pre-conditions to qualify for signing the Seoul Accord. 

6. The Board needs to be sustainable:

Like all other Boards of Professionals, BCPM has to be financially sustainable (after a possible initial grant from the Government). This would typically be from fees from accreditation exercises, subscriptions from registered members, and from several professional activities.

The Seoul Accord

As mentioned, one of the main reasons for establishing BCPM is to be able to sign the Seoul Accord. Established in December 2008, the Seoul Accord is a multi-lateral mutual recognition agreement among agencies responsible for the accreditation or recognition of undergraduate computing and IT related programmes.

The Seoul Accord's vision is to become recognised internationally as a leader in defining and promulgating standards and guidelines for the academic preparation of computing professionals. The Seoul Accord is non-governmental and is not affiliated with any country.

The Seoul Accord has since become the international authority on quality assurance and the promotion and development of best practices for the improvement of education in the computing and IT-related professions. The Accord establishes the equivalence in terms of outcomes relative to the preparation for professional practice. [More details (in particular, for governance and graduate attributes) are available at http://goo.gl/nXBwb ]

One of the many benefits of signing the Seoul Accord is that the agreement and the resulting standard that it creates allows the Malaysian public and private sector to recruit with confidence computing or Information Technology workers from around the world with accredited degrees.

It also helps graduates from Malaysian institutions of higher learning who want to work or study abroad be recognised world-wide if Malaysia is a signatory.

The accredited degrees here refer to those that comply with the standards of the curricula and targeted graduate attributes as stipulated by the Seoul Accord, which establishes an internationally recognised ‘desired’ level of quality of programmes and graduates.

Currently there are eight signatories, the British Computer Society, Australian Computer Society, Canadian Information Processing Society, ABET Inc (USA), JABEE (Japan), ABEEK (Republic of Korea), HKIE (Hong Kong) and IEET (Taiwan).

 The signatories to the Accord need to be authorities, agencies, or institutions that are representative of the computing and IT-related community and that have statutory powers or recognised professional authority for accrediting/recognising programmes designed to satisfy the academic requirements for professional computing and IT-related practice within a defined jurisdiction (e.g. country, economy, geographic region).

In Malaysia, by tradition and practice, a Bill is required to empower/accord a body as such. 



1) General Questions

 2) Part 1: The need for Certification of Professionals and to sign the Seoul Accord

There has always been a strong desire to make our Computing/ICT graduates have a professional status (akin to engineers, medical doctors, accountants, etc.) as well as be internationally recognised as such. Three points are very relevant here:
  • The best way to achieve both is to sign the Seoul Accord (equivalent to the Washington Accord for engineering), which will not only enforce the maintenance of the required level to be considered professionals, but it also provides a status that is recognised worldwide.
  • However, all signatories of the Seoul Accord need to have a Board (or Society or any entity) that is equivalent to the proposed BCPM, which will have to be accorded the necessary authority and be responsible to audit and accredit Computing/ICT programmes, to register professional members, and to regulate them.
  • It is important to note that with the professional status comes a considerably high degree of responsibility, especially in terms of a guarantee of quality and accountability.

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Speech By Tun Dr Mahathir Bin Mohamad At The Inaugural Launch Of OSDC.my And Open Source Industry Global Linkage At Berjaya Times Square Monday, 1 June, 2009


Tun Dr Mahathir Bin Mohamad At The Inaugural Launch Of OSDC.my And Open Source Industry Global Linkage At Berjaya Times Square Monday, 1 June, 2009

Speech By Tun Dr Mahathir Bin Mohamad At The Inaugural Launch Of OSDC.my And Open Source Industry Global Linkage At Berjaya Times Square Monday, 1 June, 2009

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Archive in Facebook. OSDC.my Discussion Group In Facebook.



Speech By Tun Dr Mahathir Bin Mohamad At The Inaugural Launch Of OSDC.my And Open Source Industry Global Linkage At Berjaya Times Square Monday, 1 June, 2009


Pictures


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Origin


SPEECH BY

TUN DR MAHATHIR BIN MOHAMAD

AT THE INAUGURAL LAUNCH OF OSDC.MY

AND OPEN SOUCE INDUSTRY GLOBAL LINKAGE

AT BERJAYA TIMES SQUARE

MONDAY, 1 JUNE, 2009

————————



 1.         Firstly I would like to thank OSDC.my for inviting me to this dinner and also to talk on a subject about which I cannot claim to know much.

 2.         I am 84 years of age, too old to learn new things.  It is an embarrassment.  I was among those who suggested Linux open source years ago.  I had almost forgotten about it.  And now you tell me you have an Open Source Development Club here in Malaysia.  I read your brief Charter on OSDC.my.  I must admit I can hardly understand it.

 3.         You talk in an entirely new language which I have difficulty in understanding.  This is made worse by the frequent use of acronyms which I always fail to remember what they represent.

 4.         I am amazed at the use of such words and terms like Foxie, Ubuntu, GNU, Perl, Ruby, Phyton, Fedora and many others, which are  the names of animals, precious stones and clothing – it goes to show that technology creators can be whimsical and relate to the mundane and the ordinary.  How else can a sophisticated thing like a computer be called Apple.  Then you have search engines called Yahoo and Google.

 5.         But the speed of progress in the information age is mind-boggling if we take for example the development of the telephone.  The cellular phone which initially was to be a replacement for a limited range radio phone is today a computer, a calculator, a TV and Internet receiver and dispatcher, a camera and about everything else that we can imagine an electronic equipment can do.  Its range now covers the whole globe, and the sound is fantastically clear.  It once saved a man’s life from a tiger attack because he could call for help with his versatile cellular phone.  I would have been eaten by the tiger because I don’t carry my cellular.  I depend on my staff.

 6.         The knowledge that we can access through the computer are limitless.  It is said that we can study for a post graduate degree simply by owning a computer.  Though not computer-savvy I have found the computer invaluable for verifying historical facts and data about almost any event that had taken place centuries ago or yesterday.

 7.         But like all things available to men, knowledge and its acquisition can be for evil as much as for the good.  The blogs for example can be used to demonize people, scare and frighten them and create panic.  The SMS can be used for similar purposes.

 8.         But we know how useful they can be for making the truth known and for individuals to air their views and feelings freely.

 9.         I was told by some people a long time ago that when we use the Internet, whatever you do or write would be recorded in some far away place.  There is no secrecy.  Since the Government was using the Internet a lot, it was frightening to think that some foreign persons would know all our so-called confidential records and correspondence.

 10.       Being na├»ve I suggested that we develop our own operating system.  I think a lot of savvy Government staff tried hard but got nowhere.   There apparently is no bypassing the Internet.

 11.       Then some started talking about Linux, about open source.  This opened up a lot of mind-boggling use of the computer.  Seems that everyone can develop software etc. etc.

 12.       At that stage I gave up.

 13.       Now you are telling me about the Global Open Source development Club.  I do not think I am qualified to be a member.

 14.       Still I appreciate the expertise and the knowledge that comes with it.

 15.       I was in Korea a few days back and I was amazed at this one-time hermit nation which has made use of modern technology to achieve what I would call wonders which changed its image completely.  Korea has the biggest percentage of people who are computer savvy.  They have trained a huge member of IT engineers so that Samsung, a name we have only recently become familiar with is now technologically as advanced as Sony Corporation. 

 16.       Under the Look East policy we have a number of young Malaysians studying engineering in Korea.  One of them had recently topped the class despite having to listen to lectures in Korean but read textbooks in English.

 17.       Japan’s development was very fast but the Koreans are faster.  Japan started its modernization during the Meiji Period more than 100 years ago.  Korea started to modernize only after World War II.  For the Koreans Japan is the benchmark.  They want to hit the benchmark, even go beyond it to become the benchmark for the world.  I think we can use Korea as a benchmark.

 18.       I have always believed that we can do what others can do.  When I asked the girl who topped the class, she had a simple answer for me.  “Malaysia Boleh” she said.

 19.       So we can. We can do what the Koreans or the Japanese can do.  All we need really is determination and the willingness to learn and do things repeatedly until we master them.  If we fail the first time we must try again, and again and again.  Believe me in the end you will succeed.

 20.       I may not be computer savvy but I believe the sum total of my knowledge today is far more than what it was before the Internet, Yahoo and Google.

 21.       I bought an Encyclopedia Britannica computer disc.  How silly.  Yahoo and Google can give me more information than the Encyclopedias.  And accessing the info is easier also.  Truly nobody should plead ignorance about anything now as you can get to know things via the computer.

 22.       So my congratulation to the OSDC.my.  Keep on enlarging your circle and all your knowledge and ideas for the open source.  Malaysia cannot but benefit from it.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

OSDC.my Links And Archive Websites, Blogs And Social Networks

List of OSDC.my Links And Archive Websites, Blogs And Social Networks that we can join and subscribe for us to share and discuss Open Source Software Development.


1) Archive to Facebook Page using Twitterfeed.com

OSDC.my Discussion Archive

https://www.facebook.com/pages/OSDCmy-Discussion-Archive/145011315561619


2) OSDC.my Mailing List Google Group Email archive with Google Feedburner


http://feeds.feedburner.com/OsdcmyMailingListGoogleGroup


3) OSDC.my in Friendfeed.com


http://friendfeed.com/osdcmy


4) OSDC.my Email Discussion feed to MOSC_my Twitter

https://twitter.com/#!/mosc_my

OSDC.my Unofficial Archive By FeedBurner


Subscribe Now!

OSDC.my Mailing List Google Group Email archive with Feedburner

http://feeds.feedburner.com/OsdcmyMailingListGoogleGroup

FeedBurner makes it easy to receive content updates in My Yahoo!, Newsgator, Bloglines, and other news readers. Click the link below

http://feeds.feedburner.com/OsdcmyUnofficialArchiveWebSite

The Feedburner from OSDC.my Unofficial Archive Web Site and OSDC.my blog is using blogger.com from Google.

http://osdc.harisfazillah.info/

OSDC.my Unofficial Archive Web Site syndicated content powered by FeedBurner.

Sunday, January 15, 2012

OSS Community Forum Regarding Proposed BCPM2011 SWOT Slide

OSS Community Forum Regarding Proposed BCPM2011 SWOT Slide


Open Source Software Community Forum Regarding Proposed Board of Computing Professional (BCPM) Bill 2011 in the implementation of Open Source Software in Malaysia. SWOT Analysis of Proposed Computing Professionals Bill 2011 slide.


Date: 6 January 2012 (Friday)
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Venue: Training Room OSCC MAMPU Level 2, MAMPU Cyberjaya 5


http://www.slideshare.net/linuxmalaysia/swot-osscommunitybcpmterhadaposcc12122012


http://www.scribd.com/doc/78308143/OSS-Community-Forum-Regarding-Proposed-BCPM2011-SWOT-Slide





OSS Community Forum Regarding Proposed BCPM2011 SWOT Slide


OSS Community Forum Regarding Proposed BCPM2011 SWOT Slide — Presentation Transcript

    1. SWOT Analysis Report ofComputing Professionals Bill 2011 OSS Community Forum 6th January 2012 1

    2. ObjectivesTo provide feedback to MOSTI on the impact ofthe proposed Bill to the implementation of theMalaysian Public Sector OSS Master Plan andOpen Source Software development in Malaysia 2

    3. BackgroundPublic Sector OSS Master Plan Overview 3

    4. What is OSS? Cake Analogy Open Source (OSS) Non OSS (Proprietary) Resepi Simple Cheese Cake 1. Spong Cake Mix 500 gram Telur(B) 9 biji Susu UHT 100 ml 2. Cream Cheese 500 gram 3. Minyak Masak 100 ml Proses Kerja: 1. Adunkan (1) hingga menjadi kembang - High speed 2. Cairkan Cream Cheese(double Boiller) 3. Masukkan Cream Cheese kedalam (1)- Low Speed.Adun hingga sebati 4. Masukkan minyak hingga sebati - Low speed.adun jangan lama sangat, nanti kualiti kekak akan terjejas. 5. Masukkan ke dalam acuan, isikan acuan di didalam takungan yang berisi air, bakar pada suhu 150 C selama 45 minit pertama. Cake Recipe Cake only (No Recipe) (Software) (Source Code)Recipe enables learning, customisation Without the recipe, it becomes a “black box”and transparency with locked-in environment 4

    5. OSS Development & Distribution Model 5

    6. OSS Benefits Strategic Technology Economy Social Increase Learning & Increase Information Marketplace Innovating Interoperability Access Competition National Global License Fee Digital Divide Capability Technology Savings / Forex Reduction Building Support Reduction WorldwideLower Barrier to Customisation & Vendor Collaboration / Market Entry / Localisation Independence Networking Exit PartnershipEnhance Security Enhance Spur New & Sovereignty Technology Service Industry Sovereignty 6

    7. Public Sector OSS Master Plan● Open Source Software (OSS) Program instructed and approved by Cabinet● Approved by the GITIC on 19th February 2004● Announcement of OSS Master Plan on 16th July 2004 7

    8. Public Sector OSS Master Plan ObjectivesMaster Plan Objectives➔ Reduce total cost of ownership➔ Increase freedom of choice of software usage➔ Increase interoperability among systems➔ Increase growth of ICT industry➔ Increase growth of OSS industry➔ Increase growth of OSS user and developer community➔ Increase growth of knowledge-based society➔ Reduce digital divide 8

    9. Public Sector OSS Master Plan OverviewOSS MASTER PLAN PHASES2004 – 2006 Phase I: Laying Foundation and Early Adoption2007 – 2010 Phase 2: Accelerated Adoption2011 – onwards Phase 3: Self Reliance We are here 9

    10. OSS Smart Partnership Eco-SystemOSS Ecosystem SustainabilityModel● Leverage existing resources● Delivery of OSS solutions and services achieved through active engagement via OSCC as the bridge 10

    11. OSS Master Plan: From Vision to Reality OPEN SOURCE ● Free licensing REALITY ● Free distribution ● More cost effective,and Objectives connected and improved ODM OSS VISION OSCC OSS Public Service ● User engagement Products Proliferation ● Larger and more ● Share and reuse and in Public competitive ICT industry ● Agility and flexibility Services Service ● Improved competence ● Meritocracy of human capital ● Transparency ● Self governance ● Lessening digital divideLaying the Foundation Accelerated Adoption Self Reliance2004 Phase I 2006 2007 Phase II 2010 2011 Phase III Early Adoption Moving Forward We are here 11

    12. OSS Adoption: 2004 - 2011 Over 97% of (Malaysian OSS Master Plan) agencies are using OSS 800 691 705 707 700 600 ~ 14-foldNo. of Agencies 500 increase in OSS 400 adoption since 345 the launch of 300 Master Plan 131 163 200 51 92 100 25 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 More than RM 205 Year Million saved 12

    13. Phase I Achievements ● 60% public sector IT personnel trained in OSS 51% Web servers in public sector agencies using OSSFoundation & Early Adoption ● ● 42% Web operating systems in public sector agencies using OSS ● 5 pilot projects implemented with the following Phase I: savings: ● 80% savings in overall licensing cost ● 58% reduction in development and consultancy efforts ● 7% savings in software support services ● 30.5% savings in overall cost 13

    14. Phase II Achievements ● 80% public sector IT personnel trained in OSS (5% are certified and achieved recognition on certification by international body)Accelerated Adoption ● 97% public sector agencies using OSS 80% of agencies using OSS back-end infrastructure Phase II: ● ● 30% of agencies using OSS desktop solutions ● 30% of Institutes of Higher Learning participated in Certified Training Provider Program ● 50% of local IT vendors are providing OSS services ● Over RM205 Million in savings through OSS implementations 14

    15. Media Highlights“Malaysia is demonstrating outstanding leadership & accomplishmentin Public Sector OSS implementation with a 97% adoption rate to date”Malaysian Business Magazine, Issue Aug 1-15, 2010 “Now the Government of Malaysia proudly reports an astonishing 97% adoption rate for OSS .... and the world should congratulate Malaysia on its outstanding leadership and accomplishments in the past five years of effort..” Michael Tiemann, President of Open Source Initiative (OSI), 9 July 2010“The government has saved up to RM200 million in costs after more than95 per cent of the government agencies had adopted the Public SectorOpen Source software (OSS) programme launched in 2004.”New Straits Times, 23 August 2010 “Malaysian government touts 95 percent OSS adoption … Some 95 percent of Malaysias government agencies have adopted open source software (OSS)” ZDNetAsia, www.zdnetasia.com, 28 January 2010 15

    16. Phase III – Self RelianceSTRATEGIC THEMES & OBJECTIVESSUSTAINMENT - ensures continuousadoption, implementation andenhancement of OSS as laid out in Sustainmentthe Master Plan. SelfENABLEMENT - provides for capacity Reliancebuilding in terms of policies andguidelines, technology infrastructure Enablement Empowermentand human capital. Human Capital ImprovementEMPOWERMENT - brings agencies Infrastructure Governance Technology Continuousto the next level towards selfreliance and excellence in innovatingOSS technologies and solutions. 16


    17. Phase III – Self Reliance Roadmap Short Term Medium Term Long Term By 2012 2013 - 2015 2016 - 2020 Transfer of ownership of  Establishment of agencies’  Agencies become subject OSS initiatives Smart Partnership matter champions for OSS- collaboration platform based systems and able to Establishment of and ecosystem to export OSS expertise to respective agencies’ OSS accelerate OSS innovation other regions standards, procedures & processes  Production of agency-  Malaysia to become one of specific enhanced OSS key global OSS contributors Establishment of application solutions and agencies’ OSS trained and  Malaysia as a technology new OSS products for certified IT teams exporter rather than a domestic and global consumer Deployment of operation- utilisation ready OSS technology platform at respective agencies to support OSS operations 17


    18. SWOT Analysis of Computing Professionals Bill 2011 from the perspective ofMalaysian Public Sector OSS Master Plan Implementation 18


    19. SWOT Analysis Report➔ Strengths➔ Weaknesses➔ Opportunities➔ Threats➔ Recommendations 19


    20. Strengths➔ Provide quality assurance of the ICT services provided by IT professionals➔ Raise level of professional standard among IT practitioners➔ Harness the growth of IT manpower and serve as repository for computing professionals➔ Enhance the countrys IT guideline and certifications towards world standards 20


    21. Weaknesses➔ Adds new layer of bureaucracy which hampers national, industry and individual growth, and the implementation of the ETP➔ Kills spontaneity and stifles creativity and innovation of the open source developer community➔ Hinders individual contributions from OSS champions➔ Hinders the fulfilment of the OSS Master Plan objectives, namely: ● increase growth of OSS user and developer community ● increase growth of knowledge-based society➔ Reduce choice of IT vendors➔ Exemption of public sector IT professionals from the Bill defeats the purpose of the Bill 21


    22. Weaknesses➔ Many areas of the proposed Bill are vague, e.g.: ● Definition of CNII projects ● The disciplines and specialisations under the BCPM registration/certification have not been defined ● No definition for certifications authorities➔ The implementation of the BCPM can be discretionary and subject to possible abuse➔ The proposed Bill provides the Board with legal protection, and not giving the computing practitioners legal recourse in case of wrongful charges.➔ Incurred cost of IT certifications will lead to the increased cost of end products, solutions and services. 22



    23. Opportunities➔ Increased number of certified OSS professionals➔ Increased number of OSS training centres including at university levels➔ Increased number of OSS products➔ OSCC as a contributor to university curriculum leading to certification➔ OSCC as one of the recognised certification body➔ All of the above can lead to greater use of OSS, more cost effective IT spending and increased human capital development 23



    24. Threats➔ Contravening the philosophy of Open Source which recognizes meritocracy as the main driver for excellence and quality, the Bill promotes the opposite by bestowing absolute power on the Board.➔ Can be detrimental to the growth of Open Source development and related products as the result of reduced contribution and hampered individual initiatives.➔ Reduced skill opportunities for IT development within the Open Source community results in shortage of IT skills and hampered human resource development.➔ Hampers the contribution of subject matter experts and input from business verticals to IT developments.➔ All the above factors contribute to the reduction of ICT growth at national levels➔ Increases the net import of ICT skills, reduces the self reliance, and hence leads to national vulnerability.➔ Limited number of certification bodies for Open Source as compared to the proprietary software leading to the growth the proprietary software usage and hence, increase the national spending. 24


    25. Recommendations The Bill should be revised, taking into consideration the speed of technology advancement, speed of government service delivery and globalisation. A panel consisting of relevant representatives, including OSCC MAMPU and OSS community, is appointed to revise the Bill. Conduct study of countries which implement similar Bills and approach taken. Ensure the Bill addresses the weaknesses and threats to the implementation of the Malaysian Public Sector OSS Master Plan and the Economic Transformation Program 25